The Unsinkable Stoker

At the turn of the twentieth century, traveling by commercial steamships, commonly called ocean liners, was all the rage.  The finest luxuries were reserved exclusively for first class passengers such as the most exquisite dining saloons, elaborate state rooms, libraries, smoking rooms, gymnasiums, and exclusive access to the main deck, called the promenade deck.  Second class passengers enjoyed more modest experiences with sparsely decorated smaller state rooms, smoking rooms, libraries, and dining facilities.  Third class passengers were housed in cabins that contained little more than a bed, were fed adequate meals, and had access to few, if any, amenities. 

Deep in the bowels of these mammoth vessels, well below the third-class areas, were the ships’ engine rooms and boiler rooms.  These rooms were extremely hot and dirty.  Workers in the boiler rooms usually worked shirtless due to the heat and were collectively called “the black gang” because they were usually covered with black coal soot.  Black gangs consisted of stokers, firemen, trimmers, and a “peggy,” the firemen’s steward who brought food and refreshments to the group.           

John Priest was a professional seaman from the port city of Southampton, England.  He worked as a black gang stoker on several British steam ships.  He and the other stokers had the back-breaking task of shoveling coal into the boiler’s firebox.  John had worked on the sea since his youth, and planned to have a long seafaring career.

In April, 1915, on the eve of World War I, the British Admiralty converted the two-year-old RMS Alcantara, a royal mail ship, into an armed merchant cruiser.  Workers fitted 6-inch guns, antiaircraft guns, and added depth charges to the ship.  For almost a year, with John as part of the ship’s black gang, the Alcantara searched for German ships and submarines in the North Atlantic Ocean.  On February 29, 1916, the Alcantara intercepted the Greif, a German merchant raider ship disguised as a Norwegian ship.  The crew of the Alcantara signaled the Greif to stop for inspection.  The Greif slowed to a near stop, but as the Alcantara reached a distance of about 2,000 yards away, the crew of the Greif increased its speed and opened fire.  The Alcantara returned fire.  For nearly two hours, the ships exchanged volleys, and both received extensive, fatal damages.  The Alcantara capsized and sank, followed by the Greif later that same day.  68 men from the Alcantara died along with 230 men from the Greif.  John was injured by shrapnel from a torpedo, but he survived.       

The British Admiralty requisitioned the passenger ship HMHS Britannic as a hospital ship.  Rooms on the upper deck which had been designed for pleasure were transformed into rooms for the wounded.  The first-class dining and reception rooms were transformed into operating rooms.  On the morning of November 21, 1916, Britannic was transporting wounded soldiers from the Greek island of Lemnos back to England through the Kea Channel when an explosion rocked the ship.  Unbeknownst to the crew of the Britannic, exactly a month earlier, a German submarine, the U-73, had planted mines in the Kea Channel.  All efforts to save the Britannic failed.  Within 65 minutes after striking the mine, Britannic disappeared into the water.  Britannic holds the record for being the largest ship lost in World War I and is the world’s largest sunken passenger ship.  Once again, John survived.

The British Admiralty converted the RMS Asturius, a royal mail ship, into a hospital ship.  John joined the black gang of the Asturius.  On the night of March 20, 1917, John’s ship was steaming toward Southampton with all of its navigational lights on.  Large illuminated red crosses distinguished John’s ship as a hospital ship.  The Asturius had just disembarked approximately 1,000 wounded soldiers at Avonmouth and was headed for Southampton, England.  At around midnight, German U-boat UC-66 torpedoed John’s ship.  The crew aimed the damaged ship toward the shore and ran it aground.  Nearly two dozen people died and many more were injured but again, John survived.

John was next assigned to the SS Donegal.  Built in 1904, the Donegal served as a passenger ferry for an English railway company until World War I.  The British Admiralty converted this ship into an ambulance ship to ferry wounded soldiers from France back to England. On April 17, 1917, the Donegal was ferrying 610 lightly wounded soldiers across the English Channel.  Ambulance ships had been required to be clearly marked and lit to make them easier to identify.  However, the British Navy disregarded these requirements after the Germany Navy began targeting these marked ships.  The Donegal was not marked as an ambulance ship.  Unbeknownst to the crew of the Donegal, a German submarine, the UC-21, was lurking beneath the water.  The German submarine fired torpedoes at the Donegal.  Explosions shook the ship.  Within a matter of minutes, the Donegal sank.  The blasts from the torpedoes and subsequent sinking claimed the lives of 29 wounded British soldiers and 12 members of the crew.  John survived, albeit with a serious head injury.       

John’s reputation preceded him.  Rumors of John’s survival record spread throughout black gangs in England.  Rumors also spread that many of John’s black gang coworkers did not survive the sinkings.  Many believed that it was bad luck to work on the same ship as the unsinkable stoker.  Each time John arrived at a new ship to take his place among its black gang, the other workers refused to work.  John, in body, may have been unsinkable, but his career was not.  Unable to find a black gang that would work with him, John had no choice but to find employment on dry land.  His days at sea had ended.           

John Priest, the unsinkable stoker, holds the distinction of being the only person to survive the sinkings of five ships which included the HMHS Asturias, RMS Alcantara, SS Donegal, HMHS Britannic, and another ship.  The first ship’s sinking which John Priest miraculously survived, albeit with frost-bitten toes and an injured leg, happened on the morning of April 15, 1912.  That ship, arguably the most famous ship in history, was called the RMS Titanic.   

Sources:
1.  The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, Washington), April 17, 1912, p.2.
2.  The Guardian (London, England), March 28, 1917, p.5.  
3.  The Times (London, England), April 23, 1917, p.10.  

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